Archive for the 'Safety Policy' Category

Dr. David Perrodin talks to Joe Bruzzese about “The Westlake” summit and centers a dynamic conversation of the bold steps participants took to advance a new school safety agenda that truly serves the best interests of students. Forget the typical school safety conference about binders and drills! This forward-thinking discussion is of incredible importance to everyone, but especially educators or parents of the 50 million children that attend school in America each day! Joe Bruzzese is the CEO of Sprigeo, the nation’s leader in online reporting systems for safety threats, bullying incidents and self-harm. He’s also taught graduate courses at UC-Santa Barbara, authored the book “A Parent’s guide to the Middle Years” - which is available on Amazon. As a former school administrator and current parent of two teens he's covered all his bases when it comes to schools and safety. In the fall of 2016, Joe invited a dozen of America’s top K-12 school leaders to a special “focus-group action summit” called “The Westlake”. Reflecting upon that epic “meeting of the top minds”, Joe believes that those three days in California launched a fresh safety narrative for schools across the country and explains how that innovative blueprint will be further honed by a second gathering of the country’s most prolific school leaders. OTHER FORMATS: You can also listen to this podcast on The 405 Media http://the405media.com/the-safety-doc/ This podcast can be watched on YouTube https://youtu.be/VAGZ1Qn9xK0 FOLLOW ME: On Twitter @SafetyPhD and subscribe to this YouTube channel and the SoundCloud RSS feed. DR. PERRODIN'S SAFETY BLOG: https://crisisprepconsulting.wordpress.com/ SAFETY DOC WEBSITE: www.safetyphd.com I will respond to discussion thread comments or questions & also to emails. SPRIGEO WEBSITE: www.sprigeo.com

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Search and Rescue dogs (and their handlers) are incredible assets to locating missing individuals. However, a poorly executed search effort is a distinct possibility as the “Professional” rescue teams are compromised by the well-intentioned, but amateur handlers that are, with concerning frequency, self-dispatching to incident venues and interfering with evidence and overall efficiency of time-sensitive operations. I interviewed Jennifer Fritton, Search and Rescue Dog handler, to learn more about the training and protocols for deployment of a search and rescue dog. While one would assume that rescue dogs are deemed such through a standardized training and competency assessment, that’s only a partially accurate statement. Efforts to move toward standardized baseline credentials are underway, but there remains variation between how dogs are trained and how dogs are deemed qualified to participate in various search and rescue scenes. IMMEDIATE ACTIONS TO TAKE IF A CHILD WANDERS AWAY: Jennifer clarified that school staff should mobilize and go to “probable” and “high-risk” areas with their cell phones per the direction of a principal or designee. This can be done prior to the arrival of law enforcement. Although such a step makes sense, it might not be considered by the school administrator who is preparing to interface with policy and emergency responders, sharing a description of the child, perhaps sharing main points from the child’s IEP (for example, is the child non-verbal?), and trying to identify a staging area. These are crucial steps. However, Jennifer noted that awareness of certain rescue profiles have proven effective in searches. For example, she shared that children with autism might gravitate to bodies of water, railroad tracks and tall objects, such as towers. She added that children with autism have been located within large machinery and buildings. On the other hand, a person with dementia tends to be linear and will try to overcome a barrier, such as a fence, rather than navigating around it. Still, someone expressing harm to self is likely to stay within 1000 feet of a known road or trail. The biggest take-aways from my interview with Ms. Fritton where as follows: 1) SAR professionals must work under the direction of law enforcement. Self-dispatch is a problem and must be mitigated as best as possible. 2) Don’t wait for the law enforcement to arrive to dispatch personnel to “high probability” locations. The people you dispatch aren’t technically searchers, but are more likely to serve in the role of interceptors or to simply observe a sign of the missing subject, such as a mitten. 3) Make staff aware of what to anticipate in the event that a SAR occurs at the school premises. Also, educate staff on their roles and also the need to avoid rallying a rescue crowd to help with a by-foot search. If necessary, the police will coordinate such efforts. 4) If you are interested in learning more about being a member of a SAR team, perhaps in the role of a support to the team or as a handler, it is best to inquire with local law enforcement in order to be directed to the “professional” teams that are contacted by police relative to persons or teams that maintain engaging websites and abide by less formal protocols. This interview can be accessed via the following media sites: YouTube: https://youtu.be/pe0-JJmhmCE The 405 Media (9PM Pacific M-R): http://the405media.com/the-safety-doc/ Subscribe to the SoundCloud RSS feed for this podcast: http://feeds.soundcloud.com/users/soundcloud:users:253648050/sounds.rss Follow me (The Safety Doc) on Twitter @SafetyPhD Follow my safety blog: https://crisisprepconsulting.wordpress.com/

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Did you know that some professional sports stadiums now equip their safety personnel with mobile devices with a drop down menu that enables them to notify a special group of responders in the event of a drone attack? App-based large venue safety management tools are evolving at incredible rates. This special "behind the scenes" episode of “The Safety Doc” podcast features an interview with Scott Meyers, VP of Sales for ISS24/7, the industry leader setting the standard for venue management software and always improving that standard via the regular input of stakeholders through both analytics and brainstorming focus groups. Levi Stadium, home to the San Francisco 49ers, is one of many professional properties where ISS24/7 helps to reduce risks and maximize guest experience. By digitally documenting and tracking incidents, requests, tasks, work orders, preventative maintenance, inspections, guard tours, and even lost and found items, the ISS 24/7 software elevates every facet of an organization to the highest level of efficiency and performance. Still, Scott shares that major gaps continue to challenge those charged with ensuring safe venues. And while user-friendly icon-based mobile app managed systems have become common at the professional and college levels, there is very little penetration into K-12 settings, even for districts with 70 or more schools! This podcast is also available on Youtube: https://youtu.be/D2YxxgZgrsg 405 Media (9PM Pacific M-R): http://the405media.com/the-safety-doc/ Follow me on Twitter @SafetyPhD Follow my blog at https://crisisprepconsulting.wordpress.com/ Learn about ISS24/7: http://www.iss247.com/

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