Doc samples locations in his town on a Saturday afternoon to determine face validity of the impact of the coronavirus event on everyday life in southern Wisconsin about 40 minutes north of the state capital. Places visited included the hospital, a park, WalMart, a grocery store, a school and the armory. You’ll be surprised at what was notably different today compared to the same locations just one week ago! The video version of this is available on The Safety Doc Podcast YouTube Channel as episode #123. FACE VALIDITY. This is a term taken from research and means simply whether the test appears (at face value) to measure what it claims to. Think of it this way, if a thermometer read 77 degrees, yet you were standing outside shivering and snow was falling, the “face validity” of the thermometer wouldn’t match what you were actually experiencing. Maybe it’s 77 and sunny somewhere, but certainly not here and not right now. MEDIA BIAS. Media is incomplete and stitched with bias. To help identify valid news reports you should seek face validity – or, check things out for yourself. Better yet, develop a network of reliable friends across the country (or globe) to tell you what they are observing and experiencing with their own senses in their settings. VELOCITY OF INFORMATION.  Doc explains the avalanche of information people have to deal with for the first 72 hours of a sentinel event – including the coronavirus. He also shares that people’s responses are often not aligned until a week or more after an event. For example, how drive-through food service workers should wear PPE and safely interact with patrons. And, why aren’t postal carriers wearing gloves as though go house to house in Doc’s neighborhood? HOSPITAL. Visitor parking lot was empty. Curb parking near “respiratory entrance” was also empty. The back parking lot was full, but no activity while I was there. GROCERY STORE. 30% of the parking lot was full. WALMART. 40% of the parking lot was full. No signs of a drive-through virus testing tent. PARK. People walking, kids biking and at least 3 folks fishing! ARMORY. A handful of civilian vehicles in the parking lot and two or three more military vehicles. Massive front entrance gates that were closed a week ago were open today. Adjacent airstrip was quiet and no helicopters or military aircraft on site. SCHOOLS. The high school and one elementary school were completely vacant – not a single car in the parking lots. A sign on the door indicated that schools were closed due to coronavirus and were being sanitized. The high school would be a FEMA location if needed, but no evidence of any staging of assets or preparation of the site. DOC’S NEIGHBORHOOD. Mitch was full-throttle bananas with his leaf blower, Tim hadn’t taken advantage of the nice weather to bring in the reindeer or take down the Christmas lights, and somebody was building something a few houses up the street. FOLLOW DR. PERRODIN: Twitter @SafetyPhD and subscribe to The Safety Doc YouTube channel & Apple Podcasts. SAFETY DOC WEBSITE & BLOG: www.safetyphd.com. The Safety Doc Podcast is hosted & produced by David Perrodin, PhD. ENDORSEMENTS. Opinions are those of the host & guests. The show adheres to nondiscrimination principles while seeking to bring forward productive discourse & debate on topics relevant to personal or institutional safety. LOOKING FOR DR. TIMOTHY LUDWIG, PHD? Dr. Perrodin’s “Safety Doc Podcast” negotiates school and community safety. To be informed about industrial safety, please contact Appalachian State University Professor Dr. Timothy Ludwig, PhD, at www.safety-doc.com. This is episode 123.

  • Purchase Dr. Perrodin’s Book: School of Errors – Rethinking School Safety in America. www.schooloferrors.com
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